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SUMMARY OF THIS WEEK'S SHOW:-

My grandmother started walking five miles a day when she was sixty. She’s ninety-seven now, and we don’t know where the heck she is. -Ellen DeGeneres

  • Guess the sound – this week our animal has amazing eyesight and can see up to 3 miles! 
  • Derek & Doreen go shopping.  It's time to ditch the duffle coat.
  • An interview with Pat Hipkiss.  If you have dreamed about walking the Inca Trail in Peru / Machu Picchu then this interview will not disappoint.
  • Education slot: This week I chat about “leave no trace” principles.  Most people think this means “don’t litter”, but in fact, it means so much more than that.
  • We then end the show with Janet & John’s latest antics.  I love John’s optimism when they got lost and I’m digging the outfit this week! 


TRANSCRIPT & SHOW NOTES

Hello everybody my name is Julia Doherty and a very warm welcome to episode 5 of the Adventure Geek Walking Club Podcast.  

This is a show for those who love everything to do with the outdoors, backpacking, hiking and of course walking. Hopefully we have something for everyone in each episode. So without further ado, let me explain the contents of this weeks show. 

We always start the podcast with a bit of a quiz in the form of “guess the sound”.  This will be a sound of an animal, bird, or something to do with the outdoors. As always, I will give you a bit of a clue before playing the sound, and finish up with some unknown facts about the animal at the end of the show. 

Segment two continues with the adventures of Derek & Doreen as they go walking shopping and decide that it is time to ditch the duffle coat! 

Segment number three is an interview with Pat Hipkiss.  If you have dreamed about walking the Inca Trail in Peru / Machu Picchu then this interview will not disappoint. 

The fourth segment is an education slot. This week I chat about “leave no trace” principles.  Most people think this means “don’t litter”, but in fact, it means so much more than that. 

We then end the show with Janet & John’s latest antics.  I love John’s optimism when they got lost and I’m digging the outfit this week! {giggle}

#1 – GUESS THE SOUND

So, without further ado, let’s get this show on the road, and see if you can guess this week’s soundbite.  I did promise a bit of a clue, so I googled “unknown facts about this animal”.  Google told me that these animals have amazing eyesore and can see up to 3 miles away.  Here’s the sound….

PLAY SOUND

The answer to the soundbite will be revealed at the end of the podcast. 

#2 – DEREK AND DOREEN EXPLORE THE HEART OF THE SHIRES

Over to Nigel for this week’s episode of Derek & Doreen. 

SWOOSH

PLAY DERICK & DOREEN EPISODE 2

Thanks Nigel.  You can’t go wrong with Go Outdoors or, if you look closely at their website, you will notice that the logo currently says Go Indoors… brilliant marketing! 

Pat Hipkiss Inca Trrail

I am now going to transition over to this week’s interview with Pat Hipkiss. If you have always dreamt of exploring the ruins of Machu Picchu along the Inca Trail in Peru, or perhaps you have already walked this trail and would love a trip down memory lane then sit back and relax and enjoy this interview. 

SWOOSH

PLAY INTERVIEW

Thanks for your time today Pat, you were awesome.  For our listeners, if breast cancer awareness is close to your heart then I have put the link in the show notes for https://walkthewalk.org/ – where you can see all their upcoming events. 

Next week we have Alison Snelling who is going to be talking about personal location beacons and sharing lots of good stuff about walking and hiking in general. 

PING

#4 – EDUCATION SLOT

Right, time for this week’s education slot.  If you spend much time in the great outdoors, you’re likely to hear the phrase “Leave No Trace”, but what does it mean? Simply put, it’s the best practices we should follow to enjoy and protect our natural spaces.   

The Leave No Trace Seven Principles

  1. Plan ahead and prepare.  This includes things such as scheduling your trip to avoid high use.  Visit areas in smaller groups, minimise waste by repackaging food, use navigation devices (even map and compass, to eliminate waymarking/paint on trees etc)                                
  2. Travel and camp on durable surfaces.    Try using existing campsites rather than creating new ones. If wild camping, then try and camp at least 200 ft away from water sources, To preserve the land, walk in single file along the middle of the track, even if it is wet or muddy.              
  3. Dispose of waste properly.  This applies to everything from litter, to human waste to rinse water.  Always leave a place cleaner than you found it.  Pack it in, pack it out.  Deposit human waste via a cathode which needs to be at least 6-8 inches deep and a min of 200 ft away from water sources.  Cover the cat-hole at all times.  Pack out used toilet role etc in your trash bag. To wash, please carry out water from the source to at least 200ft away.  Wash and then scatter strained water.  Soap etc will affect animals, and remember, that somewhere downstream other humans will be collecting this water for drinking purposes.                                                                         
  4. Leave what you find.  Remember – take only photos and leave only footprints.  Preserve the past.  Examine but do not touch cultural or historical artefacts. Leave plants, rocks and other natural objects as you find them, do not build furniture, structure or dig trenches.                                           
  5. Minimize campfire impacts (be careful with fire) While campfires are a timeless camping ritual, they can also be one of the most destructive ones. Far better choices include a lightweight stove for cooking and a candle lantern for light. Stargazing is an excellent alternative and is best enjoyed when your campsite is in total darkness. 
  6. Respect wildlife. Don’t approach animals. Both you and the wildlife will enjoy encounters more if you master the zoom lens on your camera and pack along with a pair of binoculars.  
  7. Be considerate of other visitors Treat others the way you would like to be treated” is a rule that applies in the outdoors, too.
  • Respect other visitors and protect the quality of their experience.
  • Be courteous. Yield to other users on the trail.
  • Step to the downhill side of the trail when encountering pack stock, such as horses and mules.
  • Take breaks and camp away from trails and other visitors.
  • Let nature's sounds prevail. Avoid loud voices and noises.
  • Manage your pet/dogs. 

PING 

#5 – SOUNDBITE ANSWER

Before we go into our finale with “Janet & John go walking” I would like to reveal the soundbite answer from the beginning of the show.  For those of you who guessed a cheetah, you would be right!  Cheetahs can see up to 3 miles away, but a few other facts include:-

  1. Cheetahs do not like to fight. They will give up their prey if a larger more aggressive animal approaches them to avoid a fight
  2. Cheetahs are sometimes mistaken for leopards but a cheetah’s spots are more round and they have long black lines that run from their eyes to their mouth called tears
  3. Cheetahs are the fastest land mammal in the world – up to 75mph!
  4. A cheetah has between 2,000 to 3,000 spots! That is a lot of spots. 

PING

#6 – JANET AND JOHN – CRUSHED SHERBET LEMONS! 

We are going to end the podcast with the amazingly talented Shiny Shoes as he reads the lates Janet and John adventures.  Over to you John. 

PLAY JANET & JOHN EPISODE 1

Thanks, John – thanks for the round-robin question.. I will add that one to my list for the future! talk about a cliff hanger…. I wonder what Janet saw?

As I draw the podcast to a close, I would like to leave you with this final thought by Ellen DeGeneres:

My grandmother started walking five miles a day when she was sixty. She’s ninety-seven now, and we don’t know where the heck she is. -Ellen DeGeneres

See you next week!

Remember to Get Outside, Get Inspired and Go Take A Hike!